Video: Frank Gehry, Paul Goldberger and Charlie Rose on the Art and Science of Architecture

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Frank Gehry and critic Paul Goldberger sat down with Charlie Rose to “the art and science of architecture and Golberger’s new biography, Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry.” You can watch the full 34-minute discussion above. 

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Built Architecture uses oak cabinetry to reorganise a mosaic-floored Barcelona apartment



Contemporary oak cabinetry features alongside original patterned tiles in this 19th-century Barcelona apartment recently renovated by local studio Built Architecture. (more…)

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Roma339 : Roma340 / Diseño Espacial


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes
  • Architects: Diseño Espacial
  • Location: Lomas de Angelópolis, Pue., Mexico
  • Design Team: Carlos Ortega Arámburo, Daniel de León Languré.
  • Photographs: Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

  • Construction: Diseño Espacial
  • Structural Project: Nabla Ingeniería y Diseño, S.A. de C.V.

© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

From the architect. Two identical houses in Angelópolis, a suburban neighborhood in the city of Puebla. Built with a limited budget and their leasing in mind, the challenge in their creation was to offer a design that would be spatially attractive to two unknown groups of users. Their design entailed a reading of the socioeconomic profile of the potential tenants, as well as interpretation of their possible domestic expectations.


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

A high prism in its access contains half of the house’s vertical circulation, followed by a ground floor that has practically no dividing walls. By taking advantage of the preexisting levels in the site’s topography, the house grows in height as the user walks towards the public spaces of the house.


Floor Plan

Floor Plan

Both houses maintain the use of walls at a minimum, using steel and window niches that replace standard windows by framing different views from its interior from floor to ceiling. Each of the four walls in every room presents a view to the outside, marked by support columns that form rectangular niches. These niches produce different framing effects towards the exterior , conceived to match with the line of vision in which furniture such as desks and sofas might be employed.


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

The structure is mainly composed by brickwork in ‘kit-kat’ imbrication, supported by structural concrete elements that match the soft pink color of the clay brickwork and its interior walls, which are mostly plastered. The houses deliberately seek unity within themselves and the neighborhood.


Section

Section

With the intention of keeping the spatial requirements to and not constraining the usage of spaces, the design of both houses merely separates the public and private functions within a simple, middle-class living programme. Its design represents an exercise in restraint.


© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

© Ana Eunice Ortíz Pámanes

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Aranda\Lasch creates pleated concrete facade for Tom Ford flagship Miami store



US firm Aranda\Lasch has completed a store for fashion designer Tom Ford in the Miami Design District, featuring an angular facade that references bold Art Deco motifs (+ slideshow). (more…)

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Murphy House / Richard Murphy Architects


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter
  • Architects: Richard Murphy Architects
  • Location: Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  • Design Team: Richard Murphy, Gareth Jones, James Falconer, Tersius Maass
  • Area: 165.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Keith Hunter


© Keith Hunter


© Keith Hunter


© Keith Hunter


© Keith Hunter

  • Structural Engineers: Create Engineering
  • Project Architect: Richard Murphy
  • Form Of Contract And/Or Procurement: unorthodox
  • M&E Consultant: Max Fordham
  • Quantity Surveyor: McLeod and Aitken
  • Lighting Consultant: Scott Kelly
  • Colour Consultant: Linda Green
  • Main Contractor: Inscape Joinery ltd
  • Electrics: Clamate Electrical
  • Plumbing: Eco-Coil & HPG Solutions
  • Plastering: Stuart Mcneil
  • Lead Plumbing: Blakes ltd
  • Steelwork: Bow engineering
  • Heating: Ecocoil
  • Air Circulation: Campbell Controls

© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

From the architect. Location

The house occupies a modest floor area, approximately half of a garden in the open space between the back of houses on Forth Street and the gable end of houses on Hart St. The junction between these two streets is an unplanned part of the New Town where two estates meet, with an unsightly gable end to the west side of Hart Street. The design needed to resolve  the issues of space, become a ‘bookend’ to the gable end and allow contemporary design within a World Heritage Site, with its front façade continuing the stonework pattern of the adjacent street façades.


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

Design, Materials and Energy Efficiency

There are a number of agendas at work.  Firstly, although it is a modest floor area of 165 m2 on a footprint of only 11 metre x 6 metre, (formerly part of a garden to a basement apartment on the adjacent Forth Street), it contains three bedrooms, a living/dining/kitchen area at varying levels, study, basement storage, garage, utility room and roof terrace.


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

Secondly, it is an essay in how contemporary design might contribute to a particular place in the New Town, which historically is an unresolved corner of typical New Town planning.  The adjacent gable end should never normally have been exposed and the house deliberately has become a “bookend” to it, with its front façade continuing the stonework pattern of the adjacent street façades. The stone has been concentrated to either end of the elevation acting as “bookends” to the more delicate elements in the centre, but with a slightly recessed element of stone placed centrally.


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

The stone itself remains divided into striated ashlar below and smooth ashlar above. There are little corner windows which pick up and reinterpret the idea of coin stones and these are co-ordinated with a bookcase internally. This idea continues onto the northern elevation to Hart Street lane.


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

The central section consists of glass block and timber garage door at ground floor level, a sliding window, stone cladding  and movable louvres. The gable end is  a triangular element floating over a horizontal window. The triangular section is clad in louvres with a background of lead and glazing. Thirdly, the house had to be careful to preserve the privacy and views of the sky from the adjacent apartment and this contributed to the bookend section.


Section

Section

And, finally, there is a very strong energy agenda in the new house.  The roof consists of photovoltaic cells and substantial south-facing glazing.  Underneath this are mechanised insulated shutters allowing the glass to generate heat when open but preventing it radiating heat when closed.  A computerised internal air circulation system takes warm air from the top of the house to the basement via a gravel rock store to produce a delayed heat source for evening use.  The main heating source for the house is a 150 metres deep ground source borehole connecting to a heat exchanger which feeds under-floor heating. There is no gas in the house. All the major windows to the house have insulated shutters.  Rainwater which follows a course of pools and waterfalls on the roof terrace finds it way to grey-water storage tanks in the basement and is then used to flush toilets.  Those tanks also supply a sprinkler system.  Heat is also extracted from the flue of a log burning stove to pre-heat hot water.


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

There are many architectural influences at work.  Not least is the work of Carlo Scarpa, on whom Richard Murphy is an authority. The roof terrace is a homage to the garden of the Querini Stampalia in Venice using the same exposed aggregate walls and sourcing tiles from Scarpa’s original manufacturer in Venice.  Internally, the Venetian “stucco lucido” coloured plasterwork is used extensively. The Sir John Soane Museum and the Maison de Verre are also great influences in the use of illusion and moving elements.  Reitveld’s Schroder house makes an appearance in a “disappearing corner” stone panel opening, designed to be the same proportions as his famous window.


© Keith Hunter

© Keith Hunter

The design was recommended refusal by Edinburgh City Council Planning Department but in a highly unusual decision, Councillors voted 9 to 4 to reject the advice of the planners and to allow construction to go ahead.

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