Storefront Presents “MEASURE”

MEASURE August 14th, 2015 – September 12th, 2015
Opening: August 13th at 7 pm
Members’ Preview: August 13th at 6 pm

To measure, to quantify the physical and intangible dimensions of a place, is to articulate facts in order to construct values. The process of creating standards and guidelines of representation allows innovation to enter the realm of the establishment. What can be measured can be capitalized, historicized, and sold.

While architectural representation conforms to a system of standards and guidelines that allows for the production of buildings, architecture is also the practice of giving form to thought. In the process of creating edifices that house social, political, and spatial relations, architects make visible the functions of society in operational and aspirational terms. In this sense, architecture is constantly innovating new forms of measurement and representation.

The pleasure and pressure to measure and be measured has become increasingly present. Access to growing data sets and new sensing technologies is widespread, and the role of public and private domains in terms of information and space are being redefined. These contemporary conditions invite us to reflect on our ideologies and values, and the drawing is a manifestation of that which we are able to (and desire to) count, measure, and draw.

Measure is an exhibition of 30 drawings by 30 international architects presenting 30 edifices of thought. Drawings are of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s gallery space on 97 Kenmare Street in New York. Architectural representation, which draws upon the diagram as a conceptual and abstract component, has historically been criticized as obscure and self referential. The proliferation of data visualization in popular media today, however, allows us to engage a much larger audience in conversations about measurement and representation. The 30 drawings presented at Storefront unveil the challenges of representation and extrapolate them onto the architect’s table and the gallery walls.

Storefront’s third annual drawing show seeks to find measures, resist measurement, and measure the immeasurable by presenting the real to the fictional and the functional to the symbolic. Measure positions the medium and the act of drawing as a process by which we seek coherence in data and representation, and shows that it is the making of facts that is the basis for the production of futurity beyond existing norms.

Participants include: The Architecture Lobby; Barozzi / Veiga; Víctor Enrich; Fake Industries Architectural Agonism (Urtzi Grau, Cristina Goberna) and Georgia Jamieson; FIG Projects; FleaFollyArchitects; Formlessfinder; Michelle Fornabai; Steven Holl; Bernard Khoury; Kohn Pedersen Fox Assoc.; KUTONOTUK (Matthew Jull + Leena Cho); Erika Loana; Jon Lott / PARA Project; MAIO; m-a-u-s-e-r (Mona Mahall + Asli Serbest); MILLIØNS; Nicholas de Monchaux; Anna Neimark; pneumastudio (Cathryn Dwyre + Chris Perry); + POOL; James Ramsey, RAAD Studio; Reiser + Umemoto; Mark Robbins; Selldorf Architects; Malkit Shoshan; Nader Tehrani / NADAAA; Urban-Think Tank; Ross Wimer; James Wines.

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Batthyány László Institute for Blinds / A4 Studio

  • Architects: A4 Studio
  • Location: Budapest, Mátyás király utca 29, 1162 Hungary
  • Architect In Charge: Géza Kendik, Zoltán Papp, Orsolya Maza, Viktória Dóczy, Sándor Gombár
  • Constructor: Grabarics Kft.
  • Area: 1500.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Courtesy of A4 Studio


Courtesy of A4 Studio


Courtesy of A4 Studio


Courtesy of A4 Studio


Courtesy of A4 Studio


Courtesy of A4 Studio

Courtesy of A4 Studio

From the architect. The institute was founded in 1898, Budapest. Most of the children who are living here have multiple disadvantages. There are blinds, disableds, mentally retardeds, and most of them are orphans. The state supports them until the age of 18. After this age they have no place to go to.


Courtesy of A4 Studio

Courtesy of A4 Studio

Our office, The A4 Studio designed the home of the 18+ children. The new building is connected to the existing one, with a bridge. In the first two floors of the 5 storey building are the common spaces, activity rooms and the dining room. In the 3 upper floors are the bedrooms.


Section

Section

Our aim was a simple, safe and user friendly building, which serves the life of the children. Most of the corridors get natural light, which helps the orientation of the blinds. The strong light transmission is reduced by the perforated metal sheets. These sheets are placed in front of the large glass surfaces. The perforation is formed from braille subtitles, with the following words: trust, home, shelter and love. Size and location of the windows are different in every bedroom, which can also help the orientation for the kids.


Courtesy of A4 Studio

Courtesy of A4 Studio

The other perforation form was designed by the abstraction of the Rubik’s cube (hungarian motive) and the flames (azerbaijani motive). This refers to the funding, which came from Azerbaijan and Hungary also. The attached film: The film; LIGHTHOUSE presents the building with the four above mentioned word (in the perforated sheets). The shooting of the interior sceens was made on site as well. Please find detailed description in the other attached document.


Courtesy of A4 Studio

Courtesy of A4 Studio

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