Vogue Living

Recipe: torn fresh figs with almonds and strawberry balsamic – Vogue Living 

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KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka

Architects: Tokujin Yoshioka
Location: , Prefecture,
Year: 2015
Photographs: Yasutake Kondo, Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka

From the architect. “Tracing the origin of cultures peculiar to Japanese by reinterpreting the culture of tea ceremony”

Japanese conception of nature is often characterized by its distinctive spacial perception involves the sensory realization of the surrounding atmosphere through what may be described as signs of energies or aura. Such way of sensual appreciation of nature’s intrinsic and beauties can be recognized in Japanese tea ceremony practice.

This project originates in the architecture plan of the Transparent Japanese House, first presented in 2002. The idea has been developed into a transparent teahouse, an architectural project incorporating a symbolic Japanese cultural image. The design of the project was presented at Glasstress 2011, the collateral event of the 54th La Biennale di Vennezia.

In the spring 2015, after 5years from the presentation of the design, “KOU-AN-Glass Teahouse” is finally unveiled at the stage of Seiryu-den which is in a precinct of Tendai Sect Shoren-in Temple designated as one of National treasures in Japan. This will be the first time that the completed full-scale work of “KOU-AN” is exhibited in the world.

Originally, the culture of Tea Ceremony was generated in the closed microcosmic space.

This “KOU-AN Glass Tea House” is not just a modernized teahouse that was evolved from traditional style teahouse but a project that traces origin of the culture which is peculiar to Japan.

“KOU-AN” does not have a scroll nor flowers that all the traditional tea houses have. However, glitters that reminds of ripples on surface of water spreads out on the floor. Also, at some point in the afternoon, there will be a rainbow light that is sunlight coming through a prism glass on the roof and it seems like a flower of light.

Tokujin came up with the idea of tracing the origin of Japanese culture that exists in our unconscious sensation by perceiving the time that is created along with nature from the teahouse which is microcosmic space and by being released by superficial designs integrating with nature.

In A.D.794, A Japanese emperor at the time visited Shogunzuka and he was convinced that Kyoto would be a right place to be a capital of Japan and started constructing the capital. Thus, Shogunzuka in a precinct of Shoren-in temple in Kyoto is a place where the city of Kyoto which symbolizes Japanese cultures.

From Kyoto to all over the world, Tokujin is hoping to provide people new experiences through the project and by producing works that make us think of the origin of Japanese culture.

KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka © Yasutake Kondo
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka
KOU-AN Glass Tea House / Tokujin Yoshioka Drawing

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Shigeru Ban on Growing Up, Carpentry, and Cardboard Tubes

He may have risen to prominence for his disaster relief architecture and deft use of recyclable materials, but Shigeru Ban describes his idiosyncratic use of material as an “accident.” Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, the 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate recalls turning to cardboard tubes as a matter of necessity. “I had to create a design for an exhibition,” Ban told the newspaper, “But I couldn’t afford wood. Instead, I used the many paper tubes from rolls of drafting paper that were lying around. The tubes turned out to be quite strong.” The most prominent of Ban’s cardboard tube structures is Christchurch’s Cardboard Cathedral, built in the aftermath of an earthquake that devastated the city in early 2011. Read WSJ’s full interview with Ban here.

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Filler Residence / PIQUE

Architects: PIQUE
Location: , OR, USA
Contractor: High Timber Construction
Area: 4845.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Alan Brandt

From the architect. Because the lot is flat, the building is kept to one level and features long rooflines to emphasize the horizontal lines of the landscape.

Deep overhangs on the west side of the site create outdoor rooms to capture western views and look out toward the golf course. With so much glass on the western façade, these overhangs are sized to appropriately manage solar heat gain according to the seasonal demands.

The floating roof plane has two large opposing arcs cut out to form an “H” shape. The connecting piece of the “H” hovers above the primary circulation and defines the thoroughfare between private wings of the house.

Board formed concrete planters and landscape walls act as buffers between the home and the golf course on the west side and between the home and the road on the east as well as help stitch the building form into the flat site.   All colors on the building have been kept to a natural brownish tone to echo the colors and textures of the surrounding landscape.

Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE © Alan Brandt
Filler Residence / PIQUE Site Location Diagram
Filler Residence / PIQUE Floor Plan
Filler Residence / PIQUE Views Diagram
Filler Residence / PIQUE Diagram 2
Filler Residence / PIQUE Diagram 3
Filler Residence / PIQUE Diagram 4

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Richard Serra’s East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert

A new sculpture has risen in the desert of : “East-West/West-East,” Richard Serra‘s second public commission by the Gulf nation. Sited in a barren landscape that was suggested by Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, the former Emir, the  is comprised of four steel plates incrementally placed and standing perpendicular to the ground.

Much like Serra’s first Qatari sculpture – “7″ in Doha – the German rolled steel structure will oxidize, changing from gray to orange and eventually a dark amber, much like the Seagram Building in midtown, said Serra in an interview with The New Yorker. The artist hopes it will become a landmark within the country.

A selection of images, after the break. 

Story via The New Yorker

Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido
Richard Serra's East-West/West-East Rises in the Qatari Desert “East-West/West-East” / Richard Serra. Image © Nelson Garrido

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